Corante

About this author
Zack Lynch is author of The Neuro Revolution: How Brain Science Is Changing Our World (St. Martin's Press, July 2009).
He is the founder and executive director of the Neurotechnology Industry Organization (NIO) and co-founder of NeuroInsights. He serves on the advisory boards of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, the Center for Neuroeconomic Studies, Science Progress, and SocialText, a social software company. Please send newsworthy items or feedback - to Zack Lynch.
Follow me on Twitter at @neurorev
Receive by email

GUEST AUTHOR ARCHIVES
THE NEURO REVOLUTION
TNRCoverWeb120.jpg Buy on Amazon
In the Pipeline: Don't miss Derek Lowe's excellent commentary on drug discovery and the pharma industry in general at In the Pipeline

Brain Waves

« National Institute of Mental Health Update | Main | Brain Awareness Week 2006 March 13-19th »

March 6, 2006

Snow Boarding Helmets Reduce Brain Injury By 60%

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

If you ski or snow board you should get yourself a helmet. Alpine skiers and snowboarders who wear a helmet have a reduced risk of head injury, according to a study in the February 22 issue of JAMA.

Alpine skiing and snowboarding are enjoyed by several hundred million people worldwide. However, the injury risk is high, and head injuries are common in alpine skiers and snowboarders, according to background information in the article. Head injury is the most frequent reason for hospital admission and the most common cause of death among skiers and snowboarders with an 8 percent fatality rate among those admitted to hospital with head injuries. Helmet use is typically not mandatory and usage is generally low among recreational skiers and snowboarders. Although using a helmet is assumed to reduce the risk of head injuries in alpine sports, this effect is not certain.

gear-guys_1888_2725033.gifSteinar Sulheim, M.D., of the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway, and colleagues examined the association between helmet use and risk of head injury among skiers and snowboarders. Of the 3,277 individuals with injuries, 578 (17.6 percent) had head injuries. The researchers found that "using a helmet was associated with a 60 percent reduction in the risk for head injury" when comparing skiers with head injuries with uninjured controls. Use of a helmet was also associated with a 57 percent reduced risk for a potentially severe head injury. The risk for head injury was 53 percent higher among snowboarders than for alpine skiers. There also was a trend toward a lower risk for neck injuries with helmet wear.

jump_thumb.jpg"Our analysis identified beginners, male sex, youth, and snowboarders as groups with increased risk of head injuries but also showed that the protective effect of helmet use is consistent across groups," the authors write.

I just bought a helmut from Bern the other day and it made boarding Squaw Valley even more enjoyable.

Via neuroskills

Comments (4) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: X-tra


COMMENTS

1. brother on November 18, 2006 2:19 AM writes...

brother sister sex

Permalink to Comment

2. Anonymous on July 1, 2007 6:37 PM writes...

Cool...

Permalink to Comment

3. Anonymous on July 15, 2007 11:13 AM writes...

Nice

Permalink to Comment

4. Anonymous on July 22, 2007 2:51 AM writes...

Cool...

Permalink to Comment

POST A COMMENT

Thanks for signing in, . Now you can comment. (sign out)

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)





Remember me?


EMAIL THIS ENTRY TO A FRIEND

Email this entry to:

Your email address:

Message (optional):




RELATED ENTRIES
Neurotech 2010: Translational Researchers Highlight Innovation
The Neuro Revolution in China Progressing
Speakers for Neurotech 2010 - Boston, May 19-20
Giving the Brain a Voice: NIO Public Policy Tour in DC tomorrow
McGovern Institue for Brain Research at MIT Goes Web 2.0
The Neurodiagnostics Report 2010: Brain Imaging, Biomarkers and NeuroInformatics
Neuropharma FDA Approvals Down in 2009
Tel Aviv Neurotech Cluster Thrives